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Friday, January 15, 2016

Black Hole



What you see here is a gravitational vortex in our universe, our plenum. Rather fine, isn't it? I've been wanting to use that question ever since  I first heard it in a favorite film, posted in my previous entry --click here-- and yes, it is a Black Hole. Don't be alarmed. It's quite far away, but precautions should be observed. For example, I try not to bump my head on a Black Hole --not again, anyway.

The hole is black because gravitational force inside is so strong it won't allow light to escape. Starlight at its rim is accumulated from all the galaxies it has drawn down, but cannot pull away. Because we receive no information about the universe smaller than a photon (a quantum of light), this is their last visible event --and is called the event horizon. Galaxies are made of energy and matter, as are we. What became of them? After they fell in, they were compressed into an irreducible form and all the laws of physics were repealed.

In normal space physical law operates in a universe where all possibilities are assembled, even those possibilities that are mutually exclusive --as when something cannot exist because something else exists that prevents it --but there's room and time for them to avoid each other. In a Black Hole, those events are equal and compressed into singularity. Singularity is what a Black Hole squeezes into existence. Doesn't matter how many Black Holes are in the universe, they all compress their contents into the same indivisible, lawless and timeless state, by definition.

You don't get two singularities.

When that happens, the backporch phone rings:
I always answer it: "Hello, Poppy!"  And a new adventure begins.

Stay tuned!


16 comments:

  1. Dear Geo., all my life I was what people call credulous (very bad&sad experience in the last year). As I am not dumb, it only happens when I trust completely. Now I think that there might be a black hole in some people that "can not be seen because strong gravity pulls all of the light into the middle of the black hole".
    I look forward to hear from Poppy!

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    1. Dear Brigitta, Sorry to hear you suffered a disillusionment this past year. Yes, some people do draw the light out of things. But there is such a brightness about you, I believe you are resilient, even immune to darkness. And yes, we'll hear from Poppy as soon as I figure out what she's up to!

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  2. You started me to wonder... What if all the matter pulled into a black hole becomes a new galaxy or even universe? It would exist parallel to ours so we would never know the difference.

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    1. A distinct possibility, Emma. I have learned the universe does not dispose of a mystery --which suggests it is in our best interest to remain one.

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  3. You've launched a journey, or two. Black holes are fascinating mysteries and so I'm once again riddling on them, where they may lead, what happens during the intake and where they may be lurking? Thanks to your link I'm also stumbling into another gravitational vortex-your adventures with Poppy.

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    1. Poppy's a kick, Tom. As a protagonist in imagination, she can have adventures we more corporeal time travelers are denied. I don't think she's ever fallen down a gravitational vortex before --might be interesting.

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  4. Isn't it interesting, Geo, that 'black holes' are one of the things we can only 'know', or conceptualize as a theory on inference....not on direct evidence. Are we ready to take them as a path to proof?
    Fun, eh?

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    1. Fun indeed, Mike! The few times I've come too close to conceptualizing a black hole, my head collapsed. Was rushed to the corner gas station for cranial reinflation.

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  5. I hadn't met Poppy and her adventures before this, but I've been having fun reading the linked posts - and look forward to the upcoming one!

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    1. Me too, Jenny. I don't know what she'll be up to yet, but it's time she appeared again.

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  6. The description of the Black Hole sounds unnervingly like a description of Congress.
    Poppy for President!

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    1. They are anomalies of similar construction, Jon. And yes, a time-traveler in office might repair mistakes of past administrations.

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  7. I love antique phones. Got to see an old small town switchboard recently - very cool. I expect a full report should your back porch phone ever ring!

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    1. I think all us kids like old phones. Report forthcoming but as yet un-dreamt-up.

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  8. Although it was decades ago, I still have nightmares about being in my high school physics class. I knew about and understood about as much on my last class as I did on my first. It seems that when it came to science, there was a black hole in my brain. Thankfully, I was good at other subjects brcause there was light coming through in the rest of my brain matter.

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    1. Sounds like we had similar experiences: never took physics but my big brother did. He showed me what was under the symbols and formulas until it was indistinguishable from poetry, which I liked very much.

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