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Wednesday, May 17, 2017

Dragons And Details, What Dots Can Be

Let's begin with a couple of Normaphotos, as I often love to do. In the first, she heads out into the peripheral garden and notices something overhead --a herd of clouds  moving east into the Sierras.
They will pile up against mountains and rain  to refill our reservoirs. She had to get closer.
Yes, I believe she levitated. Norma has never let me watch her do that but I can't think of another explanation. If we allow our childhood imaginations to examine the central-to-right image, we see a version of Lisa's Dragon  , unretouched, breathing cool mist ahead, but there are --to the keenest-eyed observers-- a pair of dots in the upper left exhalation. Let's close in.
There appears a magpie and, further off, a heron flying east in parallel on business of their own.

No further enlargements are possible. We have learned all we can here. They all go into the mountains. It defies complication: When we learn how simple some things can be, it's surprising there's  even as many as one way of looking at them.

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Sincere thanks to Lisa, yet again, for her "Oak Dragon" (please click) .


27 comments:

  1. Were life only as simple, uncomplicated and Norma's wonderful pictures. After the revolution, I'm nominating her for the position of 'Tsar of Public Thought'....

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    1. I'd second that nomination, Mike. It seems when we must protect our inalienable rights, it is always from un-Norma-ic thought.

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  2. Hi, Geo! Lovely sky photos, Norma! Just looking at that cloudy sky is relaxing, not to mention the pretty flowers.

    I enjoy photographing clouds of all kinds. I, too, like to enlarge sky dots to see what I can find. So many people count on those clouds rising up and dropping precipitation.

    Teaching my kiddos the water cycle was always one of my favorite parts of the curriculum. I used to get a kick out of taking them to Wemlinger Water Treatment Plant which was very near our school, just so they could see the final stop for water from the mountains before it went to their homes.

    Have a great rest of the week!

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    1. Thanks,Louise. One of my favorite childhood field-trip memories is a tour of Folsom Dam on the American River. Such tremendous machineries harnessing the forces drawn from gentle clouds!

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  3. Love "herded" for clouds. They do seem to move in concert!
    If Mike is Tsar, may I be some sort of cousin with lots of jewels?

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    1. Jewels would be great, but there's always the danger of revolution --like when the Russians found out the Tsar and Czar were really the same guy.

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  4. It is that time of year. We are having a lot of rain. It is flooding not too far north of us. I only hope the river down this far will keep it's water to itself.

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    1. I second your hope, Emma. Rivers are magnificent and useful but don't always behave themselves.

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  5. Normaphotos always provide calming magic. Thank you - and her.
    I hope to never ever get to old or jaded to marvel at clouds...

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    1. Most kind. I suspect there's little danger of you losing your sense of wonder, EC.

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  6. This has evoked wonderful childhood memories, when clouds sparked the imagination and held a special magic.
    Nowadays, clouds only serve to eclipse the sun....

    (that's my dour, pessimistic alter ego talking).

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    1. With the intensity of mountain rainfall and the care that must be taken in it, I'd say your cautious attitude is justified.

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  7. Is Norma perhaps a cloud herder? Thank you for linking and appreciating my old friend the Oak Dragon - we miss him but how lucky we were to have that summer! xx

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    1. Oak Dragon is still aloft, Lisa, in the hearts and imaginations of cloud herders everywhere.

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  8. Like the clouds and birds, I too feel the draw of mountains...

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    1. I thought you might, Sage. Happy traveling!

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  9. When we can find simplicity in our lives we must grab hold and never let it go....people have a nasty habit of complicating everything.

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    1. Excellent advice, Delores. Needless complexity sure makes things unmanageable.

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  10. It's fun, and often illuminating, to zoom in and see things closer. I love the dragon, and Lisa's post which inspired your identification!

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    1. Ah! Another cloud herder. Thanks, Jenny.

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  11. Watching clouds is a perfectly wonderful to spend time.

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    1. Agreed. It's a beautiful view.

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  12. Dear Geo., the photos of Norma are beautiful!
    The knowledge that things often need to be looked up closer, and that tiny things are often overlooked, should lend wings to our senses and make us scrutinize the 'everyday' objects, because they are full of magic - here: dragons puffing herons and magpies (using the plural deliberately - in superstitious England one is always looking for a second magpie)

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    1. Dear Brigitta, Thank you! Ah yes, from the old Magpie rhyme, "One for sorrow, Two for joy..." I've found there isn't always a second Magpie, but a heron suffices.

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  13. Lovely pictures, dude. (And dudette...) And the enlarging process just goes to show ya: there's usually more going on than meets the eye. We just have to look a little closer. I wish you could send some stray clouds from that herd this-a-way. We sure could use the rain. The drought, wildfires, and outside watering bans continue here. The last time we got a little bit of rain, I ran outside with a soapy bucket of water so I could wash some of the filth off my car. A week later, it was almost as dirty as it was before I washed it.

    By the way, I found that file on my computer with the picture of Halle-Boppe over the lighthouse in Tybee Island that I told you about. If you'd like me to send it to you, send me an email. (There's an "email me" doohickey on the sidebar of my blog.)

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    1. Dear Susan, dude thanks you, dudette thanks you. Sorry Oak Dragon has not yet herded clouds your way. Will repair now to "email me" doohickey --your technical terminology exceeds mine!

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    2. Susan, I couldn't figure out how to work the doohickey. Sorry, but sure appreciate the offer.

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