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Saturday, April 15, 2017

How The Weather Is

Among the most perplexing enigmas is how the weather is. In this valley, gardeners, ranchers, farmers and city departments of public works have been plagued by drought, not 3 or 4 years of drought as California has conservatively complained to the world --in fear of inciting panic-- but 8 or 9 years. I don't know why we did that.

I don't know so many things.

But I do know the drought is over. In evidence, here is a photo Norma took yesterday on our way home from the market --a distance of four miles from our house on a road nobody much knew about 10 years ago. The tall grass was typical of springtime back then, and contained all sorts of little grazing animals one couldn't see until they ate their ways out --mice, bunnies, cattle, giraffes, dinosaurs. It has returned, but the animals have moved on.
Will they return? Perhaps not. Another mile brings us to a new sign.
This is the survival bellow of the California range. Pastures are being sold for housing tracts and industrial parks. Understandable after protracted drought, even if the grass is green again, the damage has been done. Party balloons have, for 9 years, had to be trucked pre-inflated from factories, and sky-divers were flown out-of-state to jump where there was enough air to open a parachute. But I have seen encouraging signs of reconstruction along with  zoning changes. Tomorrow, I shall take Norma to photo a gardeners' supply that sells decoys to lure the prairie animals back to this region. It's only a few miles away and quite promising.

Now it is tomorrow, and we set off our quest:
Our search led through several new housing tracts, then into fields again. We emerged onto a main road and found the place, got out and approached a well-secured fence, heard heavy footfalls running toward us from within. I was not entirely surprised.
"Help me with the gate," said T.Rex. "We can't seem to manage it alone. But jump back into your car or I might eat you. No offense."

"I understand, Instinct and all that...no problem. Here, I think that's got it."
"Yay! Thanks so much! Now, if you'll give me some help with directions, I'll lead the other animals home."

"Of course, follow the realtors' signs and arrows on the fence and look both ways before crossing the road."

I have no idea how my post about weather has run to setting the dinosaurs free, but we have the rest of the day ahead to consider it in the privacy of our thoughts and tomorrow is Easter. Your regular pastor will return after finding a pest control company equal to fortifying the manse against thunderous infestations. Hope everyone had a meaningful Good Friday and, so far, an equally meaningful Not Bad Saturday.  Go in peace.


30 comments:

  1. Hopefully the prairie animals will return (I feel optimistic about that) - - if only the dinosaurs don't deter them.
    I love the photos of that glorious sky!!
    Spring always offers the gift of hope and resurgence.
    Warm Easter wishes to you and Norma.

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    1. Thanks, Jon. Will convey photo compliment to Norma. Warm Easter wishes to you too!

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  2. I believe the animals will return. It is the way of life you know. T. Rex will agree.

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    1. Indeed, Emma, they will return to the fields. Quite a few have been guests in our yard throughout the drought.

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  3. Please do not export any of your dinosaurs over here, as so much other stuff has been exported. We have enough dinosaurs of our own, thank you very much. I was a little concerned to read that there are areas [or at least one area] in the U' States where there isn't enough air to open a parachute. I thought that only happened in space and therefore a problem only for "space cadets."

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    1. Yes, my reference to airless California weather was an uncharacteristic exaggeration, but we do have lots of space cadets. However, if any of our dinosaurs wander into France, just show them a map and they'll thunder their own ways home.

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  4. Here we had the thundering footsteps of miniature adults as they raced about finding plastic Easter Eggs. The grass was green and the rain poured down upon us. No drought here. Happy Easter Geo.

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    1. Sounds delightful, Delores. We'll be taking Easter baskets full of goodies to the grandkids this afternoon. Happy holiday to you too!

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  5. I'm sure glad the T-Rex warned you about having to eat you BEFORE he did it. Whew. And that would certainly make an interesting garden ornament.

    I hope the animals move back to the fields fairly quickly. I have an image now of your yard as a kind of Noah's Ark during the drought. Giraffes and all :)

    Speaking of giraffes, have you seen the newest arrival? (April's giraffe at Animal Adventure Park - live feed here: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UClnQCgFa9lCBL-KXZMOoO9Q/live ... if you can't see the baby, he may be in the corner where the camera can't pick him up, but he'll be up and around again in short order)

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    1. T-Rexes are among the politest of monsters and always warn their prey. They also apologize to people they eat. I have seen some still photos of April and her baby and will look up the Youtube site. Thanks!

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  6. Y'know, there is some talk about returning, as in 're-planting' I guess, grizzlies to portions of the Sierra's....they are rather less polite, but still can be good neighbors.

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    1. I've heard something about this project and approve with caution. Grizzlies help with seed dispersal, preventing overgrazing (by prey) and replenishing nitrogen (noticeably lacking in California soil in my decades as a gardener) by littering the forests with fish-carcasses. Caution engages should we want to show our appreciation by hugging them.

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  7. Does it seem the quiet of the country disappeared in the drought?
    Down here in our portion of the Republic the hills may never have been so green and the not so small animals of the bovine variety, seem intent on eating it all.

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    1. Tom, there does seem to be an epidemic of urban sprawl --many people have come down with it since the drought.

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  8. Eventually, it seems, some animals will learn how to co-exist and then people will complain about coyotes eating their cats, alligators eating those drunk enough to go skinny dipping at night, and cougars eating joggers and rattlesnakes nipping at the heels of gardners.

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    1. A lively fight for the fittest indeed! No doubt some entrepreneur will set up bleachers and charge admission.

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  9. Do you think on that road that nobody much knew about 10 years ago that the grass will grow tall enough to hide the T-Rex?

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    1. In some areas, the grass has reached that height. However, many T-Rexes are guests in the maximum security chambers of SPCA. Happily, they are in high demand as nightclub bouncers and construction (where they are often mistaken for heavy machinery) and are rapidly entering the modern workforce.

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  10. Always hate to see a grassy grazing field scraped up and replaced by houses. I'd like that dinosaur.

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    1. Unfortunately, the fields are part of a cattle industry that has been receding from this area, and during drought, many ranchers sought greener pastures. The dinosaurs are at Multi Trend Lirio Enterprise --lots of photos at website.

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  11. Haha! I've always longed for a T-rex statue to put in my yard, especially since my GOP neighbors always have fits when my Democrat election signs appear. A T-rex would be so much more fun than the usual gnomes, and bunnies, and fairies my neighbors decorate their garden patches with. I'm glad that your drought has broken. It was a serious one. Let's hope it stays broken for a good number of years. How much more of California has to disappear under housing tracts? I feel so sad whenever I think of what has happened to Southern California (It's the part I know). I hope that you and Norma had a happy Easter together! I'm sure the grandkids enjoyed those Easter baskets!

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    1. Holiday went real well, Louise, as I trust yours did. Maybe your neighbors would be more impressed with your political signs if T-rex held them up in your yard. I like the idea too and, who knows? Dinosaurs may have been Democrats. I'm pretty old and I'm one.

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    1. By golly, it is! Good thing,too.

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  13. Incidentally, 'Rail Therapy, Inspecting The Continuum' was magnificent.

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    1. Thanks, Suze. Haven't perfected gardening by train yet but have the beer-drinking part down ok.

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  14. Wow, Geo. - so many animals sadly disappeared? (Not sad about T.Rex, though). Your giraffes were last seen over here, in Berlin - gracefully munching the young spring leaves from the many trees (more than Hamburg!) that Berlin offers.

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    1. Thanks, dear Brigitta! Yes, soon only the shorter giraffes will remain here in the U.S. Taller ones are rapidly sailing to Europe where ceilings are higher up.

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  15. Replies
    1. Yes, and polite, but I wonder if he'll be content with grazing --such teeth!

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