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Wednesday, October 19, 2016

Predacted Redux

I decided to repost the first (2009) entry in this blog, with pictures this time but there are temporal adjustments on the webcam that escape me. However I'll set the lens to focus back generally --after all, humans aren't designed to be exact, just closely approximate. Yes, I remember this one,  from 1956. Close enough.
The kid was full of hope.  
And then I am in 2016, which is (let's see, borrow from 20, carry  the one into 10's column --5 from 11 is...) 206 years later. Closely approximate. Amazing, the flannel shirt has lasted this long --and I appear no older than my later 60s. My computer is an early model, an upgraded Jacquard Analytical Engine that used to operate looms. Here, my math skills are eclipsed only by theological inaccuracies that initiated this blog.

I see the introduction has run too long, so I'll clickably link to the post under discussion called --I can't remember what it's called but click here-- and see if you can struggle through it --I sure can't. I hear this from others about their first blog posts and wonder if anybody's working on the problem. Still, I rather like its closing paragraph, especially in an election year for some reason, and will reproduce it here:

The feeling common to faith, intuition and logic is that something has opened, moved and caused ripples upon the surface of the waters; something tremendous has happened. Very much like falling in love --itself too intense for analysis-- which is esteemed by church people, intuitives, logicians alike, and misunderstood by all. As a unifying force, love elevates the enigma and will doubtless save us all if we do it more.

Now it's getting late and, I think, time to avoid thinking about stuff --especially any aspiring candidate for anything who just acts creepy-- and raid the kitchen for cookies and milk.  


20 comments:

  1. Cookies and milk, love and laughter are fine antidotes for most things.

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    1. I have always thought so, and associate those elements with happiness.

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  2. I think cookies and milk could act as a unifying force for something....probably late night acid reflux. Lets's all chew our Tums together.

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    1. Cookies and milk as a force of nature, yes, lesser differences are set aside.

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  3. Geo., Indeed we should love more. We need to lover more.
    Re: the theological arguments you noted in your earlier post-I've developed an aversion to those who think the Bible or any holy text is to be enforced, when they begin acting like sheriffs of faith. Sorry Charlie!
    Now about that lady with the mink heads still attached. I remember my first encounter with such. How weird! My first notion of animal cruelty. I also wondered what other unimaginable horrors might such a person do. Eat a child?
    And what an amazing flannel shirt! That and the milk and cookies will overcome any computational frazzle.

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    1. Indeed, we NEED to love more --beyond our involuted church enclaves-- if we're ever going to end cruelty. But, to be fair, too many church-ladies in the 1950s had access only to Joan Crawford-oid makeup that just made them look like they ate their young.

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  4. I get the distinct feeling that you watched the FINAL debate last night. Love sounds good right now.

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    1. Having sample the first two debates, I guiltily admit to giving the 3rd one a miss. Mrs. Clinton had my vote already.

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  5. I'm glad you posted the link to your first post, Geo. All my practice reading your posts is paying off - I understood it without re-reading ANY of it!

    Well, almost any.

    And I agree with all who have commented already re love, cookies and milk, Tums, hypocritical behavior, flannel shirts and debate #3.

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    1. O Jenny, cookies, milk and flannel shirts are among the greatest pleasures in life. Debate #3, I'm content to review in text and excerpts.

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  6. Like others here have implied, I'm suspicious of anything that claims to be a 'unifying force'. I'll walk away quickly from it, or them.

    Damn Geo, this, this being this election cycle, has taken it's toll on me. I actually get angina when listening to the debates, or Trump for over 15 seconds. What does it say that I've let this have this power over me?? You'd think that by 70 I'd know better. Ah well....
    BTW, here in Montana actually you see few flannel shirts...lots of wool, though. Woolrich shirts over any t shirt keeps one warm.
    Cheers,
    Mike

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    1. Mike, at the turn of the century I was only 51 but still couldn't watch W.Bush try to give a speech --not after he insulted and impugned the integrity of his fellow Republican and nominee-rival in the primaries (McCain's patriotism was unimpeachable). I get the same feeling from Trump, maybe even worse. Don't let him give you angina --he's not worth it.

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  7. Yours was an impressive first post, Geo. My first blog post was one of the very worst that I ever wrote - - something about the bland Texas landscape. I first started blogging when AOL first introduced blogs, which was sometime around the Taft administration.

    Ah, if only we could be young and full of hope again! Unfortunately, I'm old and full of.......

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    1. Kind Jon, thanks. Like you, I'm now old and full 0f.......wisdom. I delight in your posts.

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  8. Thanks for the link to your first post. I made a comment there, as it was unthinkable that such a fine post should have no comments at all.

    Love, cookies, and milk make the world go 'round. And after watching the debate the other night, (Yes, I AM a glutton for punishment.) I felt like I needed to drown my sorrows in a tankard of milk.

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    1. Susan, thank you for using the time-travel-app to leave a generous comment on this blog's 1st post(to which I just replied in 2009). I was much encouraged by it and kept posting. Encountering good minds like yours has made blogging worthwhile.

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  9. I too have found that flannel shirts adapt and last many more years than I thought they would. Makes me think they are proof of survival of what fits.
    x

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    1. I delight in your comment, Laura! This could be why Darwin avoided disputing the superior fitness of flannel-based life-forms.

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  10. I guffawed quietly, I leaned into the screen with delight as I read. I thought to myself, they still *all* operate on looms. Love. Yes, precisely. (Or, you know, approximately.)

    --Countess Chocula.

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    1. Dear anonymous Suze, you've made my day.

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