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Sunday, May 27, 2018

PLOP

I seldom have cause to measure my sleeve print but some sense of impending encounter caused me to do it yesterday.

Plop.
"Well, hello! Who are you?
"I am a mighty tree frog and I have just attacked the sleeve of your flannel shirt."
"With what intent?"
"I intend to eat you up!"

"So how do you intend to go about that?"
"Admittedly, it will take a while."
"I am still an inexperienced tree frog. Only in the past month or so have I hatched under a Sycamore leaf, fallen into water and lived as a little fish."

"You are not a fish." 

"I had gills."

"You also had instinctual instructions. " 

"Yes, I am to launch myself toward protein, go Plop, then eat what I have overpowered and caught."

"I'm impressed by your determination, but although honored to be overpowered by you I must yield to an ant-trail I just passed at the garden edge. I'll be glad to walk you over there..."

"Don't trouble, I'll just launch myself. Bye!"

Five feet away, I heard a very faint Plop. We are all stewards of our planet.


32 comments:

  1. We are indeed stewards of our planet. And some of us need remedial lessons.

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    1. The little creatures are eager to remind us,EC, but as you know, we have to listen.

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  2. A truly delightful post. And I heartily endorse the previous comment.

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    1. Thanks Tom. EC is a truly sensitive Earthling, fluent in the language of nature.

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  3. I don't believe I've ever met a tree frog in person....they are soooo tiny and cute. I could use a few in our yard to eat ants....or an anteater...

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    1. You may yet meet a tree frog, Delores. They are ubiquitous and, between February and June, spawn in still waters here.

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  4. So cute.

    During rainy summers, we have toads lay big globby lines of eggs, which hatch and change, along the edges of the road in my neighborhood. Most don't make it because the water evaporates, but it's always great to watch the changes in the ones that do!

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    1. Harry, love toads too. I spent my 1st 9 years slong the Sacramento River and happily dug horizontal holes in the banks while adults fished. I'd return later and find toads colonizing the caves an armlength in. The grammar of nature is learned this way.

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  5. Yep, all stewards, though some do a better job than others.

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    1. Dear Susan, I suspect it's one of those rare jobs that never stops getting better.

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  6. I am disappointed that he didn't tell you his name. At any rate he is a cutie.

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    1. Dear Emma, we have to supply names --their little brains are full of survival instincts, so it's our job. His name is Plop.

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  7. A cute visitor to your plaid. So very thoughtful of mother nature to arrange the visit so close to an ant trail. She provides and we abide. The wonder of it all...

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    1. Indeed, Tom, you remind me: I must never lose the wonder, not ever.

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  8. Some of nature's greatest delights come in surprisingly small sizes.

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    1. Jon, I suspect delight is one of those quantum emotions that has no sidereal reference to time and space --like love. Plop is a beautiful creature, and though I've encountered him only once, I know he'll do well on his learning journey.

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  9. I don't think I've ever seen a tree frog though I have heard their calls. It reminds me of the poem by Gelett Burgess (though I would have thought Ogden Nash was the author): "I never saw a purple cow, I never hope to see one, But I can tell you, anyhow, I'd rather see than be one!"

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    1. Definitely from Burgess, Bruce. Although my only volume of his is "The Heart Line (a drama of San Francisco)"--October 1907, Bobbs Merrill Co.-- (yes, a 1st edition!), I have often mentally bounced that cow quote between him and Nash. He was a remarkable writer who understood his time.

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  10. Such a delightful little mite! Frogs sure can jump a long way. Imagine if we could do that. We wouldn't need cars. It would revolutionize the transportation industry!

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    1. I wouldn't mind being 1/4 inch long --I mean, if everybody else agreed to do it too. Otherwise landings and collisions would be more splat than plop. And our president would be negotiating with hungry birds, if he isn't already.

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  11. I ­čĺŚ this post and so enjoy it when things go plop.

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    1. After being on pain meds, I ­čĺŚ the same thing.

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  12. Yesterday I disturbed a ground dwelling frog, it was nearly three inches in length - it seems I had a lucky escape! I think it was all ready in pursuit of slug protein (not my favourite, but potentially a frog superfood) as it did not think to attack me. Plop is a perfect frog name, I can't improve on it. Maybe I shall call mine Plopette?
    PS: Still sending good wishes for recovery.

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    1. Dear Lisa, Glad you didn't step on Plopette. I like her name! It has an exotic ring..er plop to it that should further her socially. Bullfrogs love to share romantic slug dinners with girls named Plopette.

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  13. I didn't know tree frogs were partial to shirts. I have never seen one !

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    1. I think they sense living prey through a sort of infra-red vision, which causes them to pounce on moving heat-sources. Usually they drop onto my head or shoulder from above, but this tiny fellow tackled me from a nearby bench.

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  14. What a cute little frog; but even better is you sound like your old self! I'm hoping you are mending well. I keep looking for frogs or pollywogs in the three ponds in our open space along Piney Creek, but no luck so far. Hundreds and hundreds of minnows though. I enjoy Norma's photos so much. Take care, my friend!

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    1. Mending as best I can, dear friend, but have got a long uncertain ways to go --doing my best.

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  15. Everyone has a job to do and tree frog has found its calling.

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    1. He most certainly has --at least I think he's a he.

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