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Sunday, May 6, 2018

Bringing In The Mail

Bringing in the mail. Sounds almost like a hymn, doesn't it?

Of course the real hymn, written by Knowles Shaw, referred to the staff of life, grain (and protestant converts), which were described as "sheaves".  Sheaves are bound after reaping and of course must be brought in. Closest I come to bringing in the sheaves is fetching the mail. Other creatures, like bees, really do bring digestible sustenance back to the colony. Observe:
Norma says this is how I look when I am working underneath our cars.  I don't quite know how to respond to that. Only that I am doing some good, that I am still useful, causes me to identify with the corporate beeing pictured --bringing in the sheaves-- but bee is brainless, or nearly so. Is that the future? 

I despair to think this brain, which has served so well, might desert me in later years, if not already. So, as always, I shall resort to sentiment. Love, shall we factor that into our design? We have a love of knowledge and a grief when it is lost.

But love, when you try all your life to make loved ones happy, and have someone say, "you've done well",  there is a deep and abiding happiness --you've brought in the sheaves. The mail is quite something else.

I get frequent letters from Dr. Ami Bera, congressional representative for the 7th district in this state, my state.  I charge into the house spastic with news. I am met with the customary reproach:"Has no one ever taught you to enter a room calmly?" -- to which I reply, "Oh, you would not BELIEVE the gaps in my education!"

I am by love and kindness calmed, and agree the world has got better. The madness that descended a year ago has cooled slowly, somewhat, and a president whose only skill is coldly firing good people has warmed. Given another year or two, he might improve to being almost tepid.  If I can do it, anybody can.




31 comments:

  1. The very best people are calmed and soothed by love and kindness. And gather both and bestow them on others.
    Sadly I suspect your president is past redemption. And would only compare him to you on the 'two legs and a heart-beat' front.

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    1. "Two legs and a heartbeat" is a good start, EC., and a ways to go yet. Hope he makes it, for all our sakes.

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  2. Bringing in the sheaves, storing up the harvest...we are all so far removed from that now. The few who bring in the harvest are predominantly 'factory farms' who put no love in what they do...they have their eye on the bottom line. A precious few running family farms or those growing veggies and fruits in their back yards..even those with a couple of chickens from which thet gather eggs can still get that feeling of 'providing' of 'storing away' , indeed that feeling of bringing in the sheaves. For the rest of us the best we can do is the weekly grocery shopping which is also threatened by the on line business. We are mostly so far removed from the source of our sustenance that we unaware of the importance of good, real, fresh food and prefer to fill our stomachs with whatever is fast and easy. When you grow it yourself and prepare it yourself you become more aware and more in tune with nature. Your president now...well....I am not entirely sure he IS natural you know?

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    1. Delores, our connection with the universe is certainly conducted through the food chain. As you say, awareness is crucial. Unfortunately, there are other modes of social commerce, wealth and power that can eclipse our partnership with nature.

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  3. I try to keep busy and find a purpose for every day. Some days I succeed and other days I don’t. My Retired Man took over the job of bringing in the mail but has left me the task of cleaning out the cat’s litter. I do it well.

    I have forgotten what I forgot and and it is annoying and frightening at times.

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    1. Dear Arleen, that sounds quite familiar. Norma does more of the physically taxing jobs now. We also hire good young people for work I never used to think twice about doing. I suspect I chose my age and gender unwisely.

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  4. I don't think he's 'warmed', I think we've become numbed by the every other day new issues or things he says.
    I try, Geo, but as John Lennon said "Christ, you know it ain't easy".

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    1. Yes, dear Mike, you nailed it. We're getting used to the outrage, aren't we? I hope this divisive administration can improve into something less numbing. And, yes, I miss Lennon too.

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  5. Please forgive my being critical of your esteemed president, but if you are awaiting improvements in that quarter please don't hold your breath, we'd like to have you around for a lot longer yet.

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    1. Oh Tom, as an unimpeachably patriotic American pacifist, I intend to do all I can, but assure you apnea is not among my plans.

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  6. What I despair of is that fine brains like yours and others I know, brains that have had years of learning and experience, will eventually be lost to humanity. What gives me hope is that there are comparable brains out there in youngsters, some we've not yet identified and some we have.

    My mother has always said (and indeed still says) her worst fear is to lose her mind. Even as it is happening. The only good thing is that as she loses it, she doesn't realize it's happening.

    I don't quite know what to say about the President. It's like a three ring circus at the White House. Always something new going on, eliciting gasps from the crowd.

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    1. One of our president's tricks --which doubtless served him in some very nasty business situations-- is to keep everybody off-balance. I believe he fires people before they quit from working without a net.

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  7. P. S. I'm sorry, I don't like to criticize and I feel badly for doing so. Please know that outsiders do not equate the President with the citizens of your beautiful country.

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    1. Thanks, Jenny, Americans have turned their backs on presidents before and will no doubt have to do it again. Remember Nixon and The Vietnam war.

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    2. He responded after nearly 60,000 American deaths,
      and ended ended it.

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  8. P.P.S. That is an amazing picture of the bee! My compliments to Norma.

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    1. Compliment conveyed and appreciated. Now we're on the right focal setting!

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  9. That's sweet - associating bringing in the mail with bringing in the sheaves. Both actions are good and useful.
    Individual bees are perhaps brainless , but in group they are smart and make great decisions.

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    1. Dear DUTA, Thank you. Both mail and sheaves connect us with the worlds of commerce, friendship, charity and duty. As a species, we are no less reliant upon communication for decisions, and yes, survival, than bees.

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  10. Most of our mail is for lighting the wood burner. I don't grow much grain but all harvests are wonderful. Politicians, eventually, could make good compost, so there's always that redemption available.
    I think you've done well. And that is a fine bee portrait.

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    1. Dear Lisa, I love your idea connecting politics with fertilizer --of the bull variety I think. Thanks for compliments: have tried to do well and Norma can sure chase down a bee.

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  11. As for the comparison to the bee while you labor under the car; read that as a complement. Industry and service for a good purpose.
    The very moment before us is our best chance at anything. Being intentional
    can serve us well.
    I wish you and the Norma behind Normaphotos moments of that wonderful "deep and abiding happiness" and love in all things, bringing in mail or sheaves.

    We are learning ways to live through our national emotional depression-but we should not take our eyes off the prize, or the stars.

    Peace

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    1. Tom, that is a beautifully compassionate and uplifting comment. Thank you.

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  12. We all have gabs in our education (I’m going to have to borrow that line). I am now posting at www.thepulpitandthepen.com and invite you over.

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    1. Most kind and well-received, Sage. Thank you.

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  13. Hi, Geo! I apologize for being absent for so long. My blogging fell apart with internet access problems while in Honolulu for two months, and I'm still trying to catch up with everyone and find a rhythm. It's not the first time, and likely I'll fall behind again. I really struggle with schedules and distraction, and that only makes things worse.

    I loved this post. The hymn "Bringing in the Sheaves" is so familiar to me; it was a harvest time staple of my Northern Baptist childhood, sung in whatever church I was attending. Terry fetches the mail in our home, and now I'll be hearing that hymn when I see him coming through the door with it.

    I, too, worry about losing my mind, much more so than any physical incapacity. I take it one day at a time and am grateful for each healthy day. My grandmother MacDonald always said, "Don't borrow trouble." I'm trying not to do that!

    I loved Norma's bee photo. She is such a good photographer! I have a friend who is passionate about bees. We often talk about them, and she has had hives for the past couple of years. We both strongly feel that if we lose bees, humanity's future will be bleak.

    Sending you a big hug! It sounds like you could use one. Take care, my friend!

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    1. Thanks Louise, hug well-received. Yes, humanity and most life on Earth would suffer without bees. It's our job to see that doesn't happen. My take on falling behind schedule is to get rid of the schedule and just enjoy writing --sometimes that works. All my best to you.

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  14. Love and kindness. That's what we all count on for sustenance these days. The older we get, there's always that niggling concern that we may have outlived our usefulness, so we work a little harder each day to make a positive difference while we're still here.

    You, dude, make a positive difference.

    I just saw a comment from you on Jon's blog that you were having throat surgery. I'm sending you lots of good wishes for a speedy recovery.

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    1. Thank you, Susan, for your generous comment. Surgery took place yesterday. Routine decapitation. Survived, I think. Can feel your good wishes arrive like ocean waves. Can see them too because doped to the gills --I have gills now? I better go lie down.

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    2. Good news. Yes, take a nap. Have a wonderful weekend, dude.

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    3. Dear Susan, this is one of my most painful weekends ever. Quit pain meds last night because of unfortunate side-effects --find pinot noir more effective-- and will revisit surgeon Monday if able. Thanks so much for your concern.

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