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Friday, November 27, 2015

Fabulous Creatures #4: The Prime Fabulist





Some time back, (four years ago, I think), Luis Augusto Garcia Rosado, minister of tourism for the Mexican state of Campeche, said new evidence had emerged "...of contact between the Mayans and extraterrestrials, supported by translations of certain codices, which the government has kept secure in underground vaults for some time."

Some time.

He also spoke of "landing pads in the jungle that are 3,000 years old." Being of somewhat sensitive nature, I became alert for fabulous beasts. I do not know if these codices acknowledge any. They might. Nor do I know what Sr. Rosado meant by "some time". His government must have secured these documents at some specific date, and I am told by mathematicians that one may subtract such a date from the current date and get a specific span. I have used this little-known trick to find out how old I am (you can too, amaze your friends!).

Either no one thought to date materials in these vaults, or no one has dreamed up a date yet. Of the two possibilities, the former is least certain. Underground vaults are dark and it's hard to see what one ought to be writing. The date could be illegible. If there was a lot of cataloguing, repetition may have run to carelessness, much as most people's signatures degenerate, by and by, into lines of L's or M's. My own has been described as an ampersand evolving into a squirrel. Second possibility puts us on firmer ground. It also directs us to our fabulous beast.

It really does live in a vault, the cranial vault --very dark in there. I have included an artist's rendering of this beast (see above) --not because of any shortage of photographs but because artists' renderings of fabulous beasts are customarily more believable than photographs. This creature sits motionless, all huddled up with its parts tucked in. My guess is it's some kind of frog.
One might ask what it does in its cramped, unlit cell. Oh, it sometimes casually mentions 3000-year-old landing pads to stimulate tourism, but it does much more. It dreams, performs grand magic, loves, learns, calculates, plans and remembers. It transforms itself into whole worlds, travels the stars, makes wishes come true. One might also conclude, and rightly, that it is the prime fabulist from which all fabulous beasts spring --and has been for some time.

Some time.

There are those who will dismiss the prime fabulist as nonsense, who say there is no such creature. These people are called skeptics, and I can only suggest they get their heads examined. I'm a skeptic myself and that's how I found the thing.

27 comments:

  1. Y'know, the silhouette of the brain looks just like something I put in the oven yesterday after immersing in salt water for a day.
    And while I'm unsure about Fabulist(ism), I'm a confirmed Fabian.

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    1. Mike, the construction of humane social democracy is certainly excellent use of the fabulous creature in our heads.

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  2. As a dedicated and committed (some have been arguing it is about time) lover of fabulous beasts I am pleased (very) to see your depiction of the prime fabulist. I like that it is green too. A reminder to all of us that it is a delightful colour. A lifegiving vibrant colour...

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    1. Green is good! The brain should be a life-affirming beast.

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  3. That marvelous creature and the image depicted below the headline seem crouched and ready for a leap, perhaps into the future. I believe it to be of a genus of ganglion, one of the better princes of this epoch.

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    1. Marvelous creatures indeed, Tom, without which we would be incapable of marveling.

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  4. Well this explains so much! My thoughts are always jumping from one thing to another. Often I hear unexplained ribbets in my head. And sometimes my eyes bug out in surprise. Oh you are so right.

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    1. Unexplained ribbets seem to compound audibly along the creek on summer nights here --exchanging ideas and dreams perhaps.

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  5. When considering the subject of fabulists (of which I know nothing), I suddenly realized that if fabulists compose fables, most politicians could be called fibulists (composers of fibs). Since I am merely an inconsequential composer of music, fabulism and fibulism are only two of many things collecting dust in the nether regions of my cranial vault.

    Ribbet!

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    1. I like your term, "fibulist". Fibulists will hopefully be rarer as Fabians and a kinder world obtains.

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  6. Please be careful, Geo. It is said that certain hierarchies do not like this kind of esoteric information being given to the general public. I am not in the least bit surprised that the prime fabulist you describe does in fact exist, and plays a significant role in people's thinking. Many are the times people take huge leaps (of faith) under the pf's influence. Bats and bees, the former in belfries, the latter in bonnets, are two more interstellar inhabitants that - or so I believe - that have journeyed from afar to settle on Earth.

    I must repeat my injunction to be careful. One never knows who is hiding in our cranial vaults.

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    1. I'll be careful, Tom. I've got inhabitants of my belfry and bonnet down to manageable numbers and am working on the flea in my ear.

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  7. My cranial vault, I fear, contains a geriatric frog suffering from a (so far) mild form of dementia. I have tried to vault it into the future but it keeps landing with a squishy plop right here in the present. It seems to have no problem with leaping backwards.

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    1. Mine lunges after flying insects. I have put screens up.

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  8. "an ampersand evolving into a squirrel" - hee hee! Perhaps you should have been a doctor :)

    The brain does bear an uncanny resemblance to a frog at rest, doesn't it?

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    1. Jenny, my penmanship, though not perfect, is still too good for pharmacists to find legible.

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  9. Very nice post!! Sorry I haven't been by in a while. I wanted to thank you for stopping by and leaving a comment on my post where I mentioned my Milwaukee Brace. Good for you son having the surgery at such a young age. I'm glad he doesn't have much trouble with his back now.

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    1. Thanks, Lori. The Milwaukee Brace helped slow things down and is far more manageable than the old-style plaster casts --a lovely friend had to wear one when we were in high school. However, an improved version of the plaster cast has been revived for some toddler-aged patients and can eliminate need for later surgery.

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  10. I woke up agitated and sad in the middle of the night and came to blogdom to hobnob with my fellow wizards. Now you've lifted my spirit with the realization that my prime fabulist has needed a mighty fine wine for some time now! Thank you, Geo. You always inspire me x

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    1. My pleasure and privilege dear Austan. Time to let sleep set us dreaming over Oz in the company of good minds. Let us be as balloon ascensionists now and go dreaming.

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    2. P.S. Jeremiah was a bullfrog. He was a good friend of mine --and thus begins a Jeremiad.

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  11. This explains froggie behavior in humans...

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    1. By golly it does. There is a serenity in frogs that I've always admired --except for eating flies, I wouldn't mind being one.

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  12. Ah, now that explains it. Judging by my increased flights of fancy and outta control imagination, my prime fabulist has obviously been expanding even faster than my waistline. Perhaps I should start wearing earplugs to prevent cranial leakage.

    Another fun post, dude!

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    1. Susan, as an ardent follower of your imagination I am satisfied that your prime fabulist is quite happy in its home, and intends to remain there. Earplugs would only make it stuffy and impel the headfrog to kick them out. Dudes are good diagnosticians.

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  13. That little maths trick is going to feature in our Christmas party repertoire! Thanks Geo. from me and my prime fabulist :-)

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    1. It predicts my age will be 66 by Christmas. That can't be right, can it?

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